Welcome
The Lu group's interests lie at the interface between chemistry and biology. We are developing innovative chemical approaches to provide deeper insight into biological structures and functions. We are also taking advantage of recently developed biological tools to advance many areas in chemistry, such as inorganic chemistry, chemical biology, and materials chemistry. We strive to make significant contributions in three principal areas of research:
  1. Biosynthetic Inorganic Chemistry and its application in environmentally benign catalysis in renewable energy generation and pharmaceuticals.
  2. Fundamentals of DNAzymes and Sensor Development for environmental monitoring and medical diagnostics.
  3. Functional DNA Nanotechnology: Precise Spatial and Dynamic Controls of Nanomaterials Assembly and its Applications in Sensing, Imaging and Medicine.
Recent News
news
2015 May | Yi Lu has been named the recipient of the 2015 Royal Society of Chemistry Applied Inorganic Chemistry Award for research on the catalytic activity of DNA in the presence of metal ions and the development of a new class of sensors for on-site and real-time detection of metal ions: Applied Inorganic Chemistry Award 2015 Winner: Prof. Yi Lu
2015 04 30 | Parisa Hosseinzadeh has been chosen as a winner of the Robert L. Switzer Award for teaching for this academic year. Congrats!
2014 09 03 | Arzeena Ali has been featured in a piece for the I-STEM Education Initiative as a Chemistry Merit Scholar: From Moon Rocks to Test Tubes: Arzeena Ali Exemplifies the STEM Pipeline in Action
2014 04 19 | Matt Ross in the lab has won the Distinction award from the Biochemistry department as a senior undergraduate student. Congratulations!
2014 03 05 | How ANDalyze is bringing water testing to the mainstream | Dr. Priya Mazumdar, a former Lu group PhD, and the Lu group sensor technology are featured by the Chicago Tribune: ANDalyze
2014 01 02 | Nucleic Acids - Chemistry and Applications | A recent virtual issue of the Journal of Organic Chemistry/Organic Letters/Journal of the American Chemical Society commemorating the 60th anniversary of the elucidation of the DNA double helix has highlighted work by Le-Le et al. dues to its "high scientific quality and broad appeal." The article describes a simple strategy to prepare uniform DNA-modified up-conversion nanoparticles as versatile bioprobes.